Thursday, March 22, 2012

Mad about MAD

MAD magazine was The Daily Show of the '50s. Fans had to wait a whole month instead of one day to view the latest satires of popular culture and politics, episode of "Spy vs. Spy," movie spoofs, song parodies, the fold-in feature at the end, the Dave Lettermanesqe mug of Alfred E. Newman … what's not to love? Feast your eyes further at the Mad Cover Site. You can view every regular issue cover starting from the comic book days of 1952 to the present—and a whole lot more. The proprietor is nothing if not thorough!
The great comic artist Sergio Aragones celebrates 50 years with MAD this year. In writing about a recent Aragones retrospective, the Santa Barbara Independent called him "an unstoppable force of visual creativity, exulting in his "genius for physical comedy based on unexpected uses of space."
Last November marked another 50th, that of Antonio Prohias's "Spy vs. Spy" comic strip. The double-crossing duo has been at cross purposes since their debut in 1961's MAD Magazine #60.
Any other MAD fans in the house?

6 comments:

  1. My brothers grew up with Mad and used to always tell me how awesome it felt when the top of the month rolled around and Mad was out. I agree with your comparison to the daily show although I don't think Generation Y-ers like myself will ever truly get it.

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  2. Makes me want to look for anthologies in used book shops!

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  3. I vividly remember going to the library as a small child and grabbing a stack of Mad magazine's and getting lost in them for hours, while the humor kind of went way over my head back then, the illustrations fascinated me.

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  4. I was always in LOVE with the covers of the MAD magazine. They always made me laugh or wonder what the real meaning behind it.

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  5. Sergio Aragones!! I absolutely love him and grew (haha) up with his "Groo the Wanderer" comic series... he sure loves his margins!! My father made me hide them, lest my mom found out:)

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  6. Anything with a history like MAD's is bound to be weighted down by nostalgia, but the current version of the magazine is still producing strong, funny, sharply written and extravagantly illustrated material that is-- as always-- not just for kids.

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