Friday, April 27, 2012

Nothing like a dame

Is it just me, or does Julie Andrews look better than ever? Here she is with Stephen Colbert talking about writing kids' books (you know he has one coming out, and we have it for pre-order at a whopping discount!). Keep watching for a sweet surprise at the end.
Here is a sample of Colbert's minuscule (and very tongue-in-cheek) opus:
John Zech writes in Composer's Datebook about a score by Stravinsky that debuted on this date. (We have it on a rare disc with the Firebird.)
The ballet "Apollo" premiered at the Library of Congress in 1928. Originally Stravinsky gave this work a French title: "Apollon Musag├Ęte" (Apollo and the Muses). Years later, Stravinsky said he preferred the simpler title "Apollo" for this work. This serene and neo-classical score was, in Stravinsky's own words, "my first attempt to compose a large-scale work in which contrasts of volume replace contrasts of instrumental color." "Apollo" was choreographed by George Balanchine, and proved a great success. In fact, it has remained Stravinsky's most popular ballet after "The Firebird," "Petrushka," and "The Rite of Spring" — his trio of colorful early scores for Diaghilev's Ballets Russes.

5 comments:

  1. I read that the ballet inspired by Stravinsky's "Apollo" was originally choreographed by Adolph Bolm in the United Stated, but Stravinsky really was more interested in the European audience and that is where George Balanchine came in and took charge of the choreography for the ballet at the Theatre Sarah Bernhardt in Paris and the rest is history.

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  2. Oh, let me guess...Colbert ends up a flagpole.

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    1. Close ... he ends up running a flag up it and commanding everyone to pledge allegiance or else!

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  3. "I AM A POLE, AND SO CAN YOU"?, WHERE ELSE BUT DAEDALUS...MY COPY IS ON RESERVE!

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  4. Cannot wait for I Am a Pole and So Can You! I'm a huge Colbert fan :)

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