Thursday, May 10, 2012

A digital tour of Rome in 320 CE


Calling all ancient history buffs: take a gander at this latest version of Rome Reborn. What a civilization! There's also a website with annotated still photos.
“Rome Reborn is an international initiative whose goal is the creation of 3D digital models illustrating the urban development of ancient Rome from the first settlement in the late Bronze Age (ca. 1000 B.C.) to the depopulation of the city in the early Middle Ages (ca. A.D. 550). With the advice of an international Scientific Advisory Committee, the leaders of the project decided that A.D. 320 was the best moment in time to begin the work of modeling. At that time, Rome had reached the peak of its population, and major Christian churches were just beginning to be built. After this date, few new civic buildings were built. Much of what survives of the ancient city dates to this period, making reconstruction less speculative than it must, perforce, be for earlier phases. But having started with A.D. 320, the Rome Reborn team intends to move both backwards and forwards in time until the entire span of time foreseen by our mission has been covered.”
Further reading: Hadrian and the Triumph of RomeKey to Rome; Rome: Then and Now; The Ancient City: A Study of the Religion, Laws, and Institutions of Greece and Rome.

14 comments:

  1. Ok that is just pure awesome!

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  2. Interesting visual trip over ancient Rome, helps with imagining city as it was.

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  3. What a labor of love:) The only city I've ever been to with more history in what is no longer there than what remains...

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  4. Very cool! I would love to see other ancient cities get the same treatment

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  5. Fascinating!!! Ditto on seeing other ancient cities get the same treatment!!! I'd love to see Pompeii Reborn!!!

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  6. I have never been much interested in ancient Rome but that video is spectacular. (How interesting to see an immense city with no advertising.)

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    1. It would be nice if they'd put some people around!

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    2. I forgot to add that 'Septizodium' has become one of my new favorite words.

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  7. I couldn't see the video but I checked out the photos and they are absolutely beautiful!

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  8. Visiting Rome is definitely on my bucket list!! I love the architecture I have seen and just how much history and culture that it has.

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    1. Can't agree more! It's on my list too. Pompeii should be next on the digital tour!

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  9. Wow! A city without dust, slaves, horses, donkeys, chickens, children, produce,chariots! Constantine would hardly recognize it!

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  10. Did anyone else notice how close together all of the "minor" buildings (read: clay-coloured) seem to be positioned? It sorta looks like one big claustrophobic mess. Was there a lack of forethought when the city was being designed I wonder? Am I completely off-base?

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    1. Rome, like most ancient cities, wasn't "designed", but evolved, or accumulated, according to population shifts, wars, natural disasters, etc. The poor quarters of most cities look like a claustrophobic mess.

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