Friday, July 20, 2012

How to have fun

Kate Hepburn knew: try new things; go outside your comfort zone. I remember my one and only experience on a zip line—my knees were knocking, but once launched it was so exhilarating I wouldn't have missed it for the world. I'd love to hear some of your adventures in living with more zing, vim, and vigor—great or small.

"Tweets, texts, emails, posts. New research says the Internet can make us lonely and depressed—and may even create more extreme forms of mental illness." 
I know this may not be in my self-interest (being a blogger), but I had to mention this Newsweek article. As the image illustrates, enough is enough!
"The first good, peer-reviewed research is emerging, and the picture is much gloomier than the trumpet blasts of Web utopians have allowed. The current incarnation of the Internet—portable, social, accelerated, and all-pervasive—may be making us not just dumber or lonelier but more depressed and anxious, prone to obsessive-compulsive and attention-deficit disorders, even outright psychotic. Our digitized minds can scan like those of drug addicts, and normal people are breaking down in sad and seemingly new ways."
Is digital media the new crack? In a sense, yes. And it's especially worrisome vis a vis kids. It's enough to make you beat a hasty retreat to your book-lined study! If you need to stock up, go to our biggest clearance sale ever, and use Source Code 12375 for an additional discount. Then get ready to put on some music, dig into your groovy new books, and bliss out. Hammock anyone?

7 comments:

  1. I always knew Hepburn could thrash!! Super rad (pardon the lexicon, I'm an aging skateboarder) stuff:) Also, the "zombie" pic is great. They should install specific lanes for texting...

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    1. I like your idea (as well as the insight into your skateboarder persona)!

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  2. So how do we use the medium of the internet to help with this problem? Because no matter how damaging to our brains, there's no going back, no turning back the tide. There has to be a way to work with technology and somehow make it less harmful, or we may as well throw in the towel.

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    1. We are such creatures of habit, and we become addicted to stimulus/response before we know it. The internet can definitely help w/ awareness. And the psych establishment is gearing up. I guess it's going to take grassroots/parental efforts to bring a sensible approach to the overload.

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  3. I have to say I agree with Amelia. The internet is certainly not going anywhere. There's always some "new thing" that people are going to be upset about. Rock music was one of them... It was something that young people embraced but older generations viewed as a hindrance or a distraction. Now it's "Get off Twitter and go listen to music" and before that it was "Stop listening to music and go read a book" and before that it was probably "Get your nose out of that book and go find a husband". ...Or something. I simplified that quite a bit but you get the point haha. Technology is this generation's rock music. We have to learn to work with it rather than against it because it's certainly not going away.
    That said, I do think it's the responsibility of parents to keep an eye on what their children are doing online. I've seen so many small kids with smart phones and I think that's a bit ridiculous. No 11 year old needs a cell phone.

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    1. I couldn't agree more. Technology is a powerful and important tool and when used properly can be brilliant. With anything there are negatives - it's important to realize that participating in Facebook should not replace face to face interactions and relationships. Independent music is surviving because of the internet - without myspace five years ago and facebook, spotify etc. indie music would have died out.

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  4. I feel that in these modern days with all the texting, twittering, and the internet, its hard to stay focused ,to many distractions, it's easy to forget the things that really matter, ie family and friends.

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