Tuesday, July 10, 2012

Pantone® people

The more I look, the more I dig this Tumbler by Angelica Dass. Before I read the background, I thought she had matched up the tones by eye, but she took a digital sample. Below is a statement, with a self-portrait.

Humanae  is a chromatic inventory, a project that reflects on the colors beyond the borders of our codes by referencing the PANTONE® color scheme.
(PANTONE® Guides are one of the main classification systems of colors, which are represented by an alphanumeric code, allowing to accurately recreate any of them in any media. It is a technical industrial standard often called Real Color).
The project development is based on a series of portraits whose background is dyed with the exact Pantone® tone extracted from a sample of 11x11 pixels of the portrayed’s face. The project’s objective is to record and catalog all possible human skin tones.
A similar sense of multiplicity can be found in Fotolog Book: A Global Snapshot for the Digital Age. Photo blogging is one of the few mediums that transcends languages, borders, and age groups, connecting people from around the world and enabling them to celebrate their common humanity.

14 comments:

  1. I have heard quite a bit about these Pantone portraits the past few days, it's quite amazing how they are done with the background being the exact color of the subjects skin tone. Beautiful and fascinating!!!!

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  2. Isaac Newton said, "The color is not in the thing itself, but in the light." Do the subjects recognize their own color, or do they look aghast, as we all do when the DMV has done with us?

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    1. Beautifully put. Thanks so much for the very apposite quote.

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  3. This is very cool! What a great project this woman has taken on. I've never heard of Pantone before, now I've learned something new today.

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  4. This project is amazing. It feels traditional or true to the spirit of the great painters, but at the same time it is using media that is relevant. E. Meissonier would totes love this technology and project.

    The possibilities are endless.
    But the one thing I can't stop thinking of is how fun it would be to paint your house with all the colors of your friends and family.

    Would a pantone home be too silence of the lambs?

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    1. now i have to go look up E. Meissonier!

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    2. Oh yeah, THAT guy. He was the acclaimed artist in a major study I read about the emergence of the Impressionists; can't think of the title at the moment.

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    3. I read about Meissonier in the Judgment of Paris, I bet we are talking about the same book. I thought it was great, and as someone who doesn't quite grasp color or painting I appreciate painters all the more!

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  5. Can't wait to see how many tones are collected! What a beautiful idea for a project...

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  6. IT APPEARS THAT THEY TOOK THE DARKEST COLOR FROM THE SELECTION TO MAKE THE PANTONE. I WOULD LIKE TO SEE IT BE THE MID-RANGE OF ALL THE LIGHT AND DARK TONES. BUT THAT'S JUST ME.

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    1. I'm with you ... it needs to go a step further.

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  7. Frankly speakingJuly 10, 2012 at 8:20 PM

    While there are applications for the process, from matching skin grafts to makeup manufacture, the background matchups don't appear to be much more accurate than what could be produced with a good eye for color. It looks to me like a high-tech sell of nothing very special.

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    1. I had the same thoughts about the technique ... there are so many planes of color on the faces. How did she decide which part to sample?

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