Tuesday, October 9, 2012

Dracula, yesterday and today

Halloween is fast upon us: TCM is in the midst of a "Monster Mash"-up, while the grocery stores have been crammed with seasonal candy since the first leaf dislodged itself in my Piedmont region of central Virginia. Following up our peek yesterday into the murky depths of vampirism, I present a gallery of Dracula covers and illustrations, both vintage and modern.
 Doubleday, 1902; below: British periodical and Garden City edition, 1928
Above left, a view of the Count's Transylvanian castle; right, one of Edward Gorey's delightfully macabre illustrations. Below, dustjackets from a Photoplay book/movie tie-ins of both Dracula and Bride of Frankenstein (my favorite horror movie!).
Moving to the modern era, a contemporary Penguin Books cover and several bloodcurdling illustrations from a new Folio Books luxury edition.
Well, enough vamping it up. Dracula aside, what was the scariest horror/supernatural book you ever read?

18 comments:

  1. My favorite is, without question, "The Haunting Of Hill House" by Shirley Jackson. Yikes! Also, "The Lottery" is a stone-cold classic! She truly set the table for "The Hunger Games."

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Funny that you mention Shirley Jackson, Wilhelm... I was going to talk about "We Have Always Lived in the Castle" by the same author. I'm not a big fan of the horror genre, but this book isn't so much "scary" as it is creepy and odd. Wonderfully written as well. I'd definitely recommend it, especially to those of you who scare easily and need something a bit milder.

      Delete
    2. I loved the movie, with Julie Harris & Claire Bloom, but alas, haven't read the book.

      Delete
  2. I'm usually much too busy eating candy corn to read horror novels, but I recommend "Hell House" by Richard Matheson. Or, if you're seeking true terror, check out anything by Bill O'Reilly...

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Or Rush Limbaugh, Sir Jordan.

      Delete
    2. is candy corn the exact same thing as candy pumpkins?; although I love both for some reason the latter seem to taste better!

      Delete
  3. Any movie based on a Stephen King novel scarred me as a child (i.e. It, The Shining, etc) so I always steered clear of his books. But in the past year I decided to give some of them a try and I must say I was pleasantly surprised! The Green Mile was fantastically creepy.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Yeah, I hadn't read any of King's titles in years. "Full Dark, No Stars", a more recent collection of his, is a great batch of creepy stories...

      Delete
    2. What's even creepier is his house. I drove by it a couple years ago while in Maine. He has a iron gate in the shape of bats and spiders. Pretty awesome!

      Delete
  4. The Sun Dial Library's Dracula looks like he's going to the opera tonight--fashionably.
    OK, you pansy panties--some classic stories to shudder over:
    "The Yellow Wallpaper" by Charlotte Perkins Gilman (note to feminists: she is not free at the end).
    "Ligeia" by E. A. Poe,
    "The Horla" by Guy de Maupassant.
    It seems the Victorians were more afraid of themselves, while the moderns are more afraid of each other. ("The Lottery, "Stepford Wives", "Seconds")

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. astute. just read Ligeia online in an electronic text--yeow! next, The Horla!

      Delete
    2. What's interesting about that is De Maupassant slit his own throat after. He was taken to a clinic run by a Dr. Esprit Blanche (?), where he died a year later.

      Delete
    3. No way! I didn't know that. We should do a blog on how famous authors died (since from your wonderful comments you are in effect a co-author of the Glean!)

      Delete
    4. Oh no-- I may occasionally supply some garnish, but you cook the feast!

      Delete
  5. Most non-fiction is scary enough for me. The current state of the world - boo!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. That explains the fright masks that look like candidates for President--aaagh!

      Delete