Wednesday, October 31, 2012

Truly spooky stories


The mostly free online magazine Byliner has rounded up myriad tales of ghosts and ghouls from its impressive archive, including fiction and nonfiction. (In their Spotlights section, they also have selections by Nobel Prize and National Book Award winners.)
And to complement the fabulous deaths-head hawkmoth above, here are a few more lighthearted Halloween images from vintage postcards.


12 comments:

  1. I have quite a fascination for owls and cute representations of them, so these are great examples of why I love Halloween imagery so much! Owls!

    The owl with the kid in the pumpkin head is a really adorable postcard.

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    1. go here http://bit.ly/SlMIbY
      for some groovy owl engravings!

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    2. Well thank you so much!!

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    3. i agree that card is adorable ... I may be a sap, but it just makes me happy!

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  2. That last one is vaguely discomfiting... how exactly will the goblins be "having fun" with me? I don't want to find out.

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  3. Happy Halloween!! Without a doubt, this is my favorite holiday:) Intentional or not, the lead picture reminds me of West Virginia's Mothman stories. Worth checking out...

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  4. Happy Halloween!!! Love the Moth at the top of the page!!!!

    I checked out BYLINER and started reading the Mary Roach tale "Something Blubbery This Way Comes," totally worth a gander. It's about a haunted whale ship, pretty good so far!!!

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  5. BYLINER led me to "The Great New England Vampire Panic", a recorded spate of disinternments of bodies to insure they are not rising to attack the living. The bodies were decapitated, or their hearts were removed and burned. The ashes were fed to ailing relatives.
    Just as in the Salem witch trials, where the troubles had their source in a fungus in rye flour, this panic was likely due to tuberculosis, says this Smithsonian magazine story, which should be read.

    There is nothing more fearsome than the ignorance of man.

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    1. Amen, amen, amen. Makes it hard to read history, if you have empathy for those who suffered from ignorance, superstition, hatred, misogyny, greed, monomaniacal pursuit of power, and all of the other ills symbolized by the opening of Pandora's box.

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  6. Zombie Woody AllenNovember 1, 2012 at 6:24 PM

    That pumpkin head kid freaks me out!!
    Reading "The Great New England Vampire Panic" right now. Pretty scary stuff. All the best scary things happen in New England... Everybody knows that.

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