Thursday, November 1, 2012

Birds of Carolina, Florida, and the Bahamas

Behold a selection of the birds featured in Volume 1 of Natural History of Carolina, Florida, and the Bahama Islands: "containing the figures of birds, beasts, fishes, serpents, insects, and plants: particularly the forest-trees, shrubs, and other plants, not hitherto described, or very incorrectly figured by authors. Together with their descriptions in English and French. To which are added, observations on the air, soil, and waters: with remarks upon agriculture, grain, pulse, roots, &c., by Mark Catesby and George Edwards." These birds have oodles of personality—even at times an aura of self-possessed nobility. The entire book can be seen online at the Biodiversity Heritage Library.
Mr Personality
Sample more avian splendor here!

17 comments:

  1. If only I had paid attention in Science class:( I also fancied myself an amateur ornithologist...

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  2. I keep wanting to try, but I have such a short attention span and a horrible grasp of detail. I love looking at them though, in person and in pictures!

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  3. The book, on the Biodiversity Heritage site, is sooo slow loading and finally froze completely. The only bird I was able to read about was the Parrot of Paradise. It was shot by an Indian in Cuba, disabled from flying, and presented to the Govereur of the Havana, who gave it to a Gentlewoman of Carolina.
    But of Periscope Neck..I couldn't find anything!
    Lovely pics, anyway.

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    1. Persistance is rewarded with ID's on all pictures:
      1-) White billed woodpecker
      2-) Large Lark (edible, they say, but please don't try)
      3-) Parrot of paradise (Cuba, way back when)
      4-) Summer duck (colorful, extravagant plumage)
      5-) Crested bittern (kind of heron)
      6-) Red curlew (sexier name Scarlet Ibis)
      7-) Blue heron (so popular there's a resort)
      8-) Flamingo (of the tasty tongue, but please don't try)
      9-) Red-winged starling (looks like a Napoleonic general,
      but a hungry headache for farmers)

      TGIF!

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  4. Love the bird at the bottom of the page on the branch. It looks so regal!!!!

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  5. Birds. Birds.

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  6. Bird, bird, bird. Bird is the word.

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  7. those last three comments were for the birds...

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    1. I see what you did there..

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  8. A friend of mine would be horrified of this. She is terribly afraid of birds. I suspect her spirit animal is a bird though.

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  9. My spirit animal is a penguin.

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  10. I think the last bird is like "hey, hey, hey, guys, down there, is that a worm? no? okay."

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  11. I feel like I've been mobbed by sparrows.

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  12. Periscope Neck turns out to be a Flamingo. What is surprising are the remarks: "The flesh is delicate, and nearest resembles that of the Partridge in taste. The tongue, above any other part, was in the highest esteem with the luxurious Romans for its exquisite flavour."

    I certainly wouldn't have guessed that.

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    Replies
    1. How hungry do you have to be to think, "Gee, I bet that bird's tongue would taste great on a Kaiser roll with bbq sauce!"?

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