Wednesday, November 28, 2012

Books about books & art by people who love books

It's no secret that our passion for books is what got all of us at Daedalus into this business in the first place. Today I thought I'd revel in that a bit by plucking out some "books about books" titles from our current stock and showing some favorite images from the equally passionate "Book community board" over at Pinterest. Here's the roll call (and don't forget they're all 10% off the listed price if you order from the web): 
Above left: 'Le Carnet Rouge' by Agata Kawa
"Figuration Feminine" by Marchesini Nella, 1901
I swear my parents have a photo of me exactly like this one. My favorite book at that age: The Musicians of Bremen.
Vintage poster promoting libraries; I like the design and the insouciant girl
Oh god, this says it all.

8 comments:

  1. Love the Eat Sleep Read, I the red journal version of that slogan.

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  2. WILHELM THADDEUS FINKNovember 28, 2012 at 5:39 PM

    So many wonderful titles on that list! I adore "My Ideal Bookshelf", though there are some PRETENTIOUS lists in there, haha. Also, the English Major post is all too true. I'm mathematically compromised to say the least:)

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    1. Ditto to the mathematically challenged for almost all liberal arts degrees.

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  3. "Curiosities of Literature" answers the question: Who has the heaviest brain? Good heavens, does someone dig the poor writer up and weigh it?

    Yes, JP, I too have been photographed like you--reading a big book. "A Treasury of Children's Literature" was the heavy title of a heavy book I dragged around because I couldn't pick it up.
    And no, you can't see it!

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  4. I really like the Agata Kawa illustration. It's cute that the only one actually "reading" is the mouse.

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    1. Good eye, Molly. I wanted to print the image bigger because I liked it so much.

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  5. I like your idea of collecting forgotten bookmarks--those who borrow books a lot might have some.
    The most interesting thing I found was a 5-mark note ("Kriegsnotgeld") from 1919 Maulbronn in Germany. Seems the central bank ran out of currency, so the localities printed their own money, only for use in the locality. The note was being used as advertisement for a travel agency.
    No love notes, alas!

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    Replies
    1. Dedications in used books are interesting too.

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