Tuesday, November 27, 2012

Majestic flowers from Thornton’s “The Temple of Flora”

As we plunge into the chilly depths of winter (those of us in the North anyway), I thought it would be restorative to contemplate some gorgeous depictions of flowers in full bloom. Some of these beauties seem almost abstract or surreal in their majestic close-ups. They're from “The Temple of Flora,” the third and final part of Robert John Thornton’s New illustration of the sexual system of Carolus von Linnaeus, engraved with state-of-the-art techniques in 1807.
Important reminder: Everything on the website is 10% off until Dec. 2—so get cracking on your Xmas list (or stock up for yourself)! If you like the above, do check out the Botanica 2013 Wall Calendar.

12 comments:

  1. These are absolutely beautiful! Thank you so much for sharing these!

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  2. Are these in the Botanica 2013 wall calendar? If so, I'm ordering now.
    I love the exotic backgrounds to the exotic blooms!

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    1. I don't think they are, but it looks similarly artistic.

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  3. The blue water lily is sacred to the Egyptians, and is found all over their art.
    The yellow center recalls the sun, and the flower opens at dawn and closes at evening, so the legend placed the Sun-god at the center of the flower. Many paintings depict the flower being mixed with wine, and a BBC test showed that the flower, when mixed with alcohol, gives a mild euphoric effect.
    Make mine a blue lily Campari, please.

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    1. I particularly love that image too ... and am crazy about Egyptian art and lore. Thanks for the enhancing background!

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  4. No one brings me flowers anymore--these are especially nice. Thank you!
    I read that some poetry was included with the lovely pictures. What a romantic gift the book would make!
    Of course, the title leaves something to be desired. (New Illustration...)

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    1. You're welcome! I agree on all fronts.

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  5. The last picture of the sad flowers clinging to life and the dismal background, hauntingly beautiful.

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  6. I went online to find a book with these pictures, and I found expensive books and reasonable ones that were labelled "print on order". How is this done? Is the book made on a printer?

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    1. these scans (low resolution) were made from a copy at a library and put on Internet Archive so we peons could enjoy them. Print on order may be high-resolution scans bound into a book. I know that my local print store does high-res scans of vintage New Yorker and Vogue covers and then frames and sells them.

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  7. reminds me of Longwood Hybrid Water-Platters at Longwood Garden.

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  8. All of these flowers are lovely!

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